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The Flower Stampede Signature Floral Pattern: Inside the Outsider Garden

Medicines. Intoxicants. Wildflowers. Weeds. The Signature Floral Pattern celebrates all outsider flowers. Beauty with attitude, just like everyone who joins the Stampede.

Our pretty garden with a punk edge features plants not often seen in floral prints. Inspired by vintage botanical illustrations, graphic designer Phoebe Miller put together a charming bouquet, carefully choosing slightly rogue varieties that complement our own Sativa logo. And, notes Phoebe, “all of these plants can be grown in our native province of Ontario.”

Take a Garden Tour

Here’s what is growing in the Flower Stampede Signature Floral Pattern:

Cannabis Sativa

Recognize this plant? It is the Flower Stampede logo, based on the Purple Haze cannabis strain. Named for its parent, Haze, and the Jimi Hendrix 1967 song, Purple Haze provides an uplifting Sativa buzz and a complex, berry-like taste.

Cannabis sativa Cannabis sativa
 Chamomile

A member of the daisy family, chamomile is one of the oldest, most widely used and well documented medicinal plants in the world. It is often enjoyed as a relaxing tea, said to help promote sleep and calm stomach pain.
 Chamomile
Dandelion

The yellow-flowered Taraxacum officinale is widely regarded as a weed, but botanists consider dandelions to be herbs. The leaves, stem, flower and root of the dandelion are used for a range of medicinal purposes. You may also enjoy Dandelion, a song by Kacey Musgraves.
Dandelion
Pansy

This common garden flower blooms in many colours and bi-colours. Pansies are hardy; they can survive light freezes and short periods of snow, which makes them popular for spring planting in Canada. Pansies are perennial, but are normally grown as annuals, since they become “leggy” and unkempt after a year.
Pansy
Viola biflora

The “two-flowered violet” is a member of the pansy family. This easy to grow perennial can take semi-shade and poor soil. A compact plant, it reaches about 20 cm in height, often in neat pincushion shapes. Its pretty and fragrant yellow flowers bloom in May and June.
Viola Biflora
Poppy

Is there a more notorious plant than the poppy? Resplendent in red, one poppy species, Papaver somniferum, is the source of opium, and has been used since ancient times as an analgesic and narcotic medicine, and as a recreational drug. Here is “Oriental Poppies,” a glorious Georgia O’Keefe painting, from 1928.
Poppy
High Bush Cranberry

Native to every province in Canada, this wonderfully named and easy going plant can be found in thickets along shorelines, swamps and forest edges. While the berries are not a favourite of many birds, they are an important survival food as the winter progresses. The bushes also provide birds with shelter from the elements and hiding places from predators.

High Bush Cranberry

High Bush Cranberry

Wood Anemone

An early spring flowering plant in the buttercup family, other common names include windflower, thimbleweed and smell fox, the last an allusion to the musky smell of its leaves. A low-growing plant that provides delightful ground cover, it spreads very slowly (six feet in 100 years!), relying on the growth of its root structure rather than spreading seeds. As such, it is a good indicator of ancient woodland.
Wood anemone
You can enjoy the Signature Floral Pattern on our Rolling Tray and 4-Layer Cannabis Grinder.

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